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Inside Zionism: Tackling One of America’s Most Taboo Topics

This entry is part 2 of 8 in the seriesINSIDE ZIONISM

America is comprised of various voter blocs – African Americans, Hispanic-Latinos, women, gays, seniors, or the upwardly mobile. Their members typically share predominant interests and goals, with variants being more an exception than rule. Hence, these voter blocs receive tremendous examination by the media, political scientists, politicians, academicians, and the general citizenry to some extent. This series is intended to study various aspects of secular Jewish nationalism, commonly referred to as Zionism. 

American-SOD

A Special Special-Interest

Why this series?

One group, the American Jewish community, occupies a unique place on the nation’s political map. While relatively small in number, this group enjoys remarkable influence in American politics in a way that is not simply understood by shared origins with non-Jewish Europeans.

In addition, American Jews unite unanimously on one issue – Israel. That categorical support rarely, if ever, finds American Jews openly critical of Israeli policy. Further, the politics of the American Jewish community are intertwined into the politics of the nation, indeed elevated to national security stature. This is analogous to a view, “What is good for Israel is good for America.”  Regardless of its accuracy or inaccuracy, particularly at an issue-by-issue level, this view is one inculcated in the American psyche. A prima facie political philosophy that, for a vast portion of the American electorate, requires no further inspection. Espousing pro-Israel positions, without exception, becomes synonymous with American patriotismAnd as such, the American Jewish voting bloc is afforded philosophical influence that no other group in America enjoys. 

Israel centrism translates into yet another unique aspect of American Jewish politics. Unlike Affirmative Action, immigration, healthcare, abortion, organized labor, or myriad other policy concerns, a foreign government, Israel, is both political benefactor and beneficiary of the predominant/unifying theme of the American Jewish voting bloc.

This tight relationship of a foreign government means the weight of that nation’s influence as political ally and one with a profound vested interest in the American Jewish community. Taken to its logical conclusion, there exists a blurring of the line that separates the Tel Aviv from Capitol Hill. 

 

[important]FYI …

Upcoming topics:

Semites and the Politics of Antisemiticism
Zionism and African American Politics
Settlements and Other Land Issues
A New Paradigm for U.S. Involvement
Jews Critical of Zionism
Nuclear Weapons

etc…

Contributing Writers:
If you are interested in contributing articles for the Inside Zionism series, send an email here.[/important]

Despite its unique dynamics, the politics of the American Jewish community receives less study than merited for reasons, some unfounded and irrational. Charges of antisemitism lurk near those who would examine American Jewish politics at a time where [Jewish] political groups openly study and influence other voting blocs as a normal practice, without the risks of public reprisal. An examination of American Jewish politics serves America’s interests as do political studies of America’s Hispanic-Latino, African American, women, seniors, and other voting blocs.

Objectives

This series looks at events, political leadership, and other issues that weave a careful thread through American policy, domestic and foreign. Ultimately, you the reader, are encouraged to participate in the ongoing conversation as we consider a fascinating American Jewish electorate.

 

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Series NavigationInside Zionism: UNESCO Quagmire, Aide & the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (Videos) >>
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