A History of Net Neutrality Battlelines

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the seriesNET NEUTRALITY AT THE CROSSROADS Series

 


NET NEUTRALITY AT THE CROSSROADS Series offers a look into what might go down as the most important week in the life of the Internet. Part 2 in this series provides a brief summary of key legal disputes involving the Federal Communications Commission [FCC] that have culminating in a recent decision at the U.S. Court of Appeals, D. C. Circuit.


 

Internet_map_1024

An Opte Project visualization of routing paths through a portion of the Internet. Created by Barrett Lyon, Opte Project is setting out to use visual graphics to accurately depict the expansiveness of the Internet. Source: Wikipedia Commons

On yesterday, I had a lengthy conversation with a medical professional who recently located to Cincinnati, Ohio from the west Central Africa country of Cameroon. Much of the discussion focused on geopolitics and the state of relations between African Americans and Africans immigrating to America.

Eventually, we turned our attention to his family back in Cameroon and ways in which he stays in contact with them. Robert indicated that he and his relatives often use Skype for video conferencing over the Internet. Robert is one of millions of users that rely on myriad services delivered over the Internet. Users that will be affected by crucial decisions now before the FCC and soon to be announced on May 15.  

Interest in segmenting Internet services is being driven by profits and a notion that today’s demands on the Internet have adverse affects on capital deployed by major carriers. These concerns and resistance to federal regulation have led to a series of judicial disputes which [more often than not] have concluded in the favor of powerful communications corporations, gradually eroding the foundations of Net Neutrality.

 

 

Series Navigation<< Net Neutrality: The Internet’s Unsung HeroThe Stakes and FCC Options to Preserve Net Neutrality >>
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