Police Deadly Force in Mission Bay vs St. Louis Shootings (Videos)

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the seriesDeFacto Black Codes
  • Police Deadly Force in Mission Bay vs St. Louis Shootings (Videos)

Texas-Nov-1866-Chapter-CXXVIII

 

  

  

 


Black Codes established a two-tier legal system that effectively criminalized black life in America. This series focuses on the rise of a defacto set of black codes that define two standards in our legal system; one for whites and another for blacks. A two-tiered set of codes that leaves blacks in prison, and often times, dead. The videos and articles in this series provide stark examples that America is gradual moving to a greater blatancy of institutional racism in the systems that govern daily life. All with a sense of indifference, if not hostility, from a considerable cross-section of whites in our nation.


 

In a span of 14 days, two men in completely separate events raised serious questions about mental instability that affects a growing number of American citizens. Two tragic events that attracted local police officers. At the center of one, a 25-year-old African American man. Involved in the second event, a 45-year-old male Caucasian. Both with mental disorders. The African American man was known to the community as having a mental disorder. The male Caucasian, later reports would indicate, was distraught over a failing business. Their paths diverge at the point as one event ends with a man dead. In the other, paramedic transport a man to the hospital for treatment.

Police use of deadly force against African Americans reaches into the very history of policing in our nation from its inception. The stark contrast is illustrated in police shootings involving Mission Bay resident, Lance Tamyo, and St. Louis resident, Kajieme Powell. 

 

MISSION BAY, SAN DIEGO: Lance Tamyo, Aug. 6, 2014 

A white male brandishes a 9-millimeter pistol at a helicopter, police, children, and other citizens. This went on for about a half hour. The incident ends with one shot and the man being taken to the hospital.

 

ST. LOUIS: Kajieme Powell (Aug 20, 2014)

Police confront an African American man whom they later claimed was wielding a knife. Within a few minutes, Powell is dead. A second video emerges that shows no evidence of the man taking offensive action, and most certainly, no major threat. If anything, nearby citizens found the man’s actions a bit humorous. Count the shots. 

 

 

Public Sentiments: 

Jeff Halevy, a fitness expert and contributor to NBC’s Today show, tweeted concerning the Kajieme Powell shooting:

Just because your knife-wielding thief son got shot by the police doesn’t make it a racial incident.

 

A Youtube visitor user identified as Mike Cruise posted concerning the Powell shooting:

 
My honest advice. Stop being niggers. Everybody. Thats not just black people its not even a racial thing. Its ignorant people. Ignorant people are the ones overrunning a town for 12 days because a kid got shot. Thats time for mourning not time for people to bandwagon a single family’s heartache to loot and rob and destroy and hurt other people who aren’t even involved with the incident. And this guy LITERALLY asked for it. You come at anyone with a knife screaming shoot me. You’re going to be shot. Is anyone surprised? You ignorant people who freak out over this kid dying over a can of soda. Blaming the police. Saying its abuse of power or brutality. You all should stand in a line for a firing squad and get off my planet. I don’t want to live in a world where you people have a voice. 
 

A Few Thoughts…

Police encounters with Lance Tamyo and Kajieme Powell reflect the underlying dichotomy of race in America. A contrast born out of slavery. Advanced through black codes and jim crow. And an unfortunate reality in virtually every segment of society today. It manifests in both the ordinary goings-on of our nation and during controversial events where race is factored. Ironically, persons like those who expressed the above often suggest, “Racism is gone from American life.” They hold that such sentiments are the views of responsible Americans. Sadly, with religious institutions, politicians, media, academicians, and other thought centers less inclined to challenge these views, racism lives on in acts of commission and omission.

 

What yours thoughts?

 

The following two tabs change content below.
  • 45
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •